Jeff Miller, the author of Behind the Lines (which I copyedited), has received an important positive review from the Publishers Weekly unit, BookLife, that reviews self-published books. The review is at   http://publishersweekly.com/978-0-9906893-0-0 and states that the book is "an intriguing read" and "will be of greatest interest to specialists in WWI and European history." Jeff has also posted all of the book's reviews on the book's website at http://wwibehindthelines.com/reviews/
Publishers Weekly is a "trade news magazine targeted at publisherslibrariansbooksellers and literary agents" and has been published continuously since 1872, according to Wikipedia. 
 
 
Today, November 14, is a big day for Charlie Souby, an old friend I’ve known since the 1980s, when we both were volunteering for KABN Radio in Big Lake, Alaska. Last week I finished copyediting Charlie’s second novel, A Shot of Malaria, so this blog is relevant to the editing part of my Tom’s Touch business.

Today Charlie’s short story “The Durschlag Twins” was published by the Saturday Evening Post online. You can read it by going to http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2014/11/14/post-fiction/contemporary-fiction-art-entertainment/the-durschlag-twins.html

I recommend you read it and see what you think, and if you like it you might consider reading his first novel, Winifred, which was revised and republished today, making this a double-milestone date for Charlie. Winifred is also quite good, with some great plot twists, and can be bought for $12.95 at http://www.buybooksontheweb.com/Search.aspx?kw=Winifred&typ=Title

The initial edition of Winifred was published in December 2010 and is available on Amazon.com, but I could not find the new version there yet.

As for A Shot of Malaria, it is due out in mid-January 2015. I will leave to the reviewers the task of telling you how good it is. Charlie’s a writer of considerable talent, and I am fortunate to have known him all these years, long before I knew he had any such talent. Regardless of what transpires with the sales of his books, in my estimation he has already achieved a great measure of success. Have a read, and see if you don’t agree.   
P.S. The story ends with the phrase "as they carried it up to my front door," even though it says "Read More" after that.